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Airlines Try to Make Fare Advertisements More Confusing

Legacy airlines are pushing a proposal that would make it more difficult to compare fares.  I know you’ll be shocked by this, but a number of airlines (United, American, Delta, Continental and Northwest) want to be able to exclude fuel surcharges from the fares that they advertise.  Currently, the fares they advertise must include all of the revenue that they get to keep (and excludes certain taxes and other fees)  Why is that a big deal?  Because airlines could then publish $3 fares from New York to London, and tack on a so-called $275 "fuel surcharge."  This is nonsense.  Let the Department of Transportation know that you won’t stand for this crap.  (Or more likely that you will stand for it because let’s be honest, they’re not going to listen to you).

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  1. To quote:

    “Because airlines could then publish $3 fares from New York to London, and tack on a so-called $275 “fuel surcharge.” This is nonsense.

    Yes, it is nonsense indeed. The rest of the world can do it – quote the fuel, which is up and down, separately, just like the taxes. And, if you think about it, the airlines are not keeping it, supposedly, they are passing it on to the thieves in the US oil industry. If an airlines do advertise per the above, may be they are to be compelled to put the word “ethics” back into their vain claim of being “good corporate citizens”. As most of business should.

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